Equine Tips

  • Aging Horses

    There are many causes of lameness in aging horses, such as chronic laminitis (founder), arthritis or stiffness from weakened bones due to demineralization. Veterinary care is important in diagnosing the cause of lameness and alleviating pain. Here are some suggestions for managing older horses with chronic lameness: Avoid obesity and heavy loads, because extra weight burdens aging joints, tendons and Continue Reading

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  • PPID (Cushing’s Disease)

    Horses of all ages may suffer from poor haircoat and skin condition due to poor nutrition, but aging horses may be especially susceptible. Good grooming and proper nutrition can go a long way toward addressing these conditions. An older horse with a long haircoat that sheds late in the year, or incompletely, may be suffering from Pituitary Pars Intermedia Disease Continue Reading

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  • Obese Senior Horses

    Obese senior horses may suffer from Equine Metabolic Syndrome (sometimes improperly referred to as hypothyroidism or peripheral Cushing's disease). These horses tend to store excess fat, especially along the crest of the neck, over the shoulders, on the rump, and in the sheath (geldings), and often exhibit chronic laminitis. Horses affected with Equine Metabolic Syndrome may also exhibit insulin resistance, Continue Reading

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  • Body Weight and Condition

    As a horse ages, its metabolism changes. Older horses usually fall into one of two categories: Easy keepers: Reduced metabolism and activity result in excessive weight gain that can be hazardous to the horse's health. Hard keepers: Loss of body weight, body condition and muscle mass caused by reduced digestive efficiency and medical issues that affect metabolic rates. It is Continue Reading

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  • Suggestions for Managing Horses with Respiratory Conditions

    Some older horses may have respiratory difficulties such as heaves (recurrent airway obstruction or RAO) or inflammatory airway disease (IAD). If your veterinarian has diagnosed a respiratory condition in your older horse, feeding and environment changes to reduce dust and allergens will be helpful. Remember to strictly follow your veterinarian's instructions with regard to barn access and housing, and consider Continue Reading

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  • The Aging Horse’s Digestive Tract

    As a horse ages, its digestive tract becomes less efficient due to decreased motility, digestion, and absorption of nutrients. In these situations, replacing whole grains with a processed feed that includes higher nutrient levels will help provide adequate nutrition to meet the horse's needs. Equine Senior® and Equine Senior® Active Healthy Edge® horse feeds are both formulated to meet these Continue Reading

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  • Monitoring the Aging Horse’s Dental Condition

    You can spot an aging horse by teeth checks. As a horse ages, the grinding motion of chewing wears the teeth down, and the teeth then erupt to replace what has worn away. At some point in a horse's life, there is not enough tooth left to replace the wear, and the horse can no longer chew properly. Further, as Continue Reading

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  • Characteristics of a Senior Horse

    First, we should define the senior horse. We typically think of a senior horse as one that is in its teens, but individual horses become seniors at different ages. The age at which a horse's nutritional needs shift from those of a mature adult horse to those of a geriatric horse is determined by genetics and the way that horse Continue Reading

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  • Proper Feeding Schedules for Horses

    Horses that are fed on a consistent schedule are less likely to go off their feed or develop undesirable stall habits (vices). Horses that are fed on inconsistent schedules may get hungry and bolt their feed, possibly resulting in digestive disorders. Also, spacing meals evenly throughout the day is healthier for the equine digestive tract. Use Only Top-Quality Feeds Avoid Continue Reading

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  • Measure Feed by Weight, not Volume

    A 3­-pound coffee can of oats is not the same amount of feed as a 3-pound coffee can of corn! The can may hold 23 pounds of oats and 4­5 pounds of corn. Further, since corn is more calorie-rich than oats, the can of corn may contain 23 times the energy as the can of oats. Any time you change Continue Reading

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